Category Archives: ENGLISH ARCHIVE

Catholic bishop calls for defending family values in Paraguay

CATHOLIC BISHOP CALLS FOR DEFENDING FAMILY VALUES IN PARAGUAY

Monday, December 10, 2012

By Peter M. Tase

Catholic bishop calls for defending family values in ParaguayOn December 9th, Catholic Bishop Adalberto Martinez paid tribute during a Sunday mass to the importance of family and “the Church’s obedience to the Constitution, because it defends the family and even sets the stage for a better life.” Bishop Martinez was referring to politicians who do not respect the church’s voice.
While placing the case of family preservation as a priority, Martinez recalled the need for its protection as the society’s basic component, and in that sense.
Bishop Martinez argued that this involves economic security and work. The Church will always advocate these issues, because it is a big family that is working towards strengthening of society.  In this context, the bishop proposed the importance of the family since ignoring it will cause a social weakness that will further increase the presence of abandoned kids in the streets, out-migration of Paraguayans. National leaders should find ways to resolve the current societal challenges to Paraguay.  On the other hand,  political candidates should keep in mind the Church’s requests so they can address appropriately the social challenges once they become the leaders of this country.   Martinez also defended marriage between one man and one woman as the will of God.
Spero writer Peter M Tase writes on Latin American business and political affairs.

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Oil Addiction

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Paraguay Inks Oil Deal to Advance on Energy Independence

  Peter M. Tase            December 11th     2012

On December 5th, President Federico Franco of Paraguay began a two-day official visit to Miami, invited by local petrochemical companies that are planning to explore oil in the the Chaco region of the South American country.

In one of his interviews, Franco stated that Paraguay has the largest oil reserves in Latin America and is looking forward to receiving US investors to conduct further studies in the Chaco. One day before his departure, the president visited the city of Neuland (about 350 miles from capital city Asuncion) and with representatives of President Energy Company led the symbolic act of officially beginning the oil exploration in Chaco, in which President Energy is expected to invest $92 Million. Seismic exploration trucks have already undertaken tests and exploratory drilling is set to begin.

In Miami, Franco met with representatives of President Energy in Miami and noted that the exploration of oil in Paraguay “means a tremendous added  value for [Paraguay’s] economy.” Franco “highly values Paraguay’s potential for energy independence and the its significance to secure an added value from oil and its byproducts.”

He added that “[oil exploration] will open a new area of development for the country,  and further enhance what we already have in the agricultural sector and create value with our existing strategic resources.” Franco received details of the latest digital technology in studies of geo-seismology undertaken by President Energy Co. in the territory of Pirity and Boqueron in the Paraguayan Chaco region. It was in the Chaco region that Paraguay fought a brief war with neighboring Bolivia in the 1930s, ostensibly over possible petroleum reserves. It is in the same region that it currently faces a restless insurgency.

The senior leadership of President Energy, Peter Levine and Richard Gonzalez, presented the rese search and methodology that confirm prospects for oil in Paraguay. According to President Energy analysis, there have been identified more than 150 million barrels of high quality crude oil, which can be refined at the state-owned Petróleos Paraguayos (Petropar) refinery at Villa Elisa in central Paraguay.

Franco, accompanied by two members of his cabinet: Minister of Industry and Trade Francisco Rivas and Minister of Schedules Fernando Pfannl, was given briefings on the technology, industrial equipment and logistics that will be installed once the oil exploration has begun in Chaco. Also joining Franco were Senators Blas Llano and Robert Acevedo.

President Franco met also with the leadership of Brightstar, who confirmed their interest in establishing headquarters in Paraguay in order to assemble 30,000 computers per month.  Brightstar will fulfill the demand of supplying computers to Paraguayan children, while the surplus will be exported overseas. Brightstar is a global company, headquartered in Miami, and is dedicated to computer and cell phone production technology.

Also, in an exclusive interview with Speroforum in Paraguay, Franco confirmed his government’s desire for closer economic and political ties to the United States. This was confirmed last month when American Airlines began direct flights to the Paraguayan capital from the U.S. Franco’s government and Paraguayan exporters are still experiencing the fallout of Paraguay’s suspension from the MERCOSUR regional trade bloc. Paraguay’s absence from a crucial vote allowed Venezuela to become a member of MERCOSUR, despite Paraguay’s long-standing opposition. Paraguayan exporters complain of bureaucratic delays at the border with Argentina, while Paraguay struggles with diplomatic wrangling over its impeachment and removal of former President Fernando Lugo this year. The Organization of American States, however, has confirmed the constitutionality and legality of Lugo’s dismissal.

Peter M. Tase is a long-time observer of Paraguayan political affairs and trade matters. He writes forSperoforum, from where this article is adapted.

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Paraguayan president seals business deals in Miami

federiko-300x225PARAGUAYAN PRESIDENT SEALS BUSINESS DEALS IN MIAMI

Friday, December 07, 2012

By Peter M. Tase

On December 5th, President Federico Franco of Paraguay began a two-day official visit to Miami, invited by local petrochemical companies that are planning to explore oil in the the Chaco region of the South American country.
In one of his interviews Franco stated that Paraguay has the largest oil reserves in Latin America and is looking forward to receiving US investors conduct further studies in the Chaco.  One day before his departure, the president visited the city of Neuland (about 350 miles from capital city Asuncion) and with the president of President Energy Company led the symbolic act of officially beginning the oil exploration in Chaco, in which President Energy is expected to invest $92 Million.
In Miami, Franco met with representatives of President Energy in Miami and noted that the exploration of oil in Paraguay “means a tremendous added  value for [Paraguay’s] economy.” Franco “highly values Paraguay’s potential for energy independence and the its significance to secure an added value from oil and its byproducts.”
He added that “[oil exploration] will open a new area of development for the country, and further enhance what we already have in the agricultural sector and create value with our existing strategic resources.” Franco received details of the latest digital technology in studies of geo-seismology undertaken by President Energy Co. in the territory of Pirity, Boqueron, Paraguayan Chaco.
The senior leadership of President Energy, Peter Levine and Richard Gonzalez, presented the research and methodology that confirm prospects for oil in Paraguay. According to President Energy analysis, there have been identified more than 150 million barrels of high quality crude oil, which can be refined at the PetróleosParaguayos (Petropar) refinery at Villa Elisa in central Paraguay.
Franco, accompanied by two members of his cabinet: Minister of Industry and Trade Francisco Rivas and Minister of Schedules Fernando Pfannl, was given briefings on the technology, industrial equipment and logistics that will be installed once the oil exploration has begun in Chaco. Also joining Franco were Senators BlasLlano and Robert Acevedo.
President Franco met also with the leadership of Brightstar, with whom confirmed their interest to establish their headquarters in Paraguay and assemble 30,000 computers per month.  Brightstar will fulfill the demand of supplying computers to Paraguayan children and the surplus will be exported overseas.   Brightstar is a global company, headquartered in Miami, and is dedicated to computer and cell phone production technology.
Senators Llano and Acevedo both took the lead to introduce legislation in the Paraguayan Congress to promote the Brightstar project.
Spero columnist Peter M Tase is an analyst of Latin American and business affairs.

Paraguayan police defeat narcoterrorists in combat

Paraguayan police defeat narcoterrorists in combat                    PARAGUAYAN POLICE DEFEAT NARCOTERRORISTS IN COMBAT

Thursday, December 06, 2012

By Peter M Tase

On Wednesday December 5, agents of the National Police of Paraguay were engaged in an armed encounter with members of the self-proclaimed Paraguayan People’s Army (Ejercito del Pueblo Paraguayo, EPP), an armed criminal group which is considered to an extended arm ofFARC in Colombia.   EPP is relatively small, operating Paraguay’s Concepcion region and frequently engaged in actions against police forces stationed in the area. During their attack in July, they set fire to a police post.  On November 15, EPP was also involved in attempting to destroy the high-tension electric towers running through the border area between Concepcion and the province of San Pedro. The latter is considered to be the poorest province of Paraguay.
In the latest full-scale encounter with EPP, the National Police wounded one member of the group. Others are being pursued by police and special forces in the nearby forests.
President Federico Franco’s government is determined to eradicate this terrorist group and has substantially increased the presence of military and special police forces in the area that is considered to be a stronghold of the EPP.   Police Commissioner Antonio Gamarra stated to Speronews that  “ five members of EPP had exchanged gun fire with police forces, one of them was wounded and there [were] no casualties among the police involved in the gun fight.” Gamarra, who led the police in the gunfight, added that they found an abandoned shotgun, as well as ammunition. The shotgun was inscribed with the words “Long live the armed struggle.”
Local police officers and members of the tactical group called “León Pirú” continue to patrol the area and are on the hunt for other members of EPP.

Bolivia poised to become new MERCOSUR member

BOLIVIA POISED TO BECOME NEW MERCOSUR MEMBER

Saturday, November 24, 2012

By Peter M. Tase

On November 21st, the government of Bolivia was invited by Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay to become a full member of Mercosur, a regional trade block in South America.  According to the treaty of Asuncion, Mercosurmember countries should vote unanimously in order to accept a new member country into its cradle. Bolivia’s accession, the same as Venezuela’s on July 31st,  will not be done in a legitimate manner since Paraguay, a founding member of Mercosur, has been suspended from this block and Asuncion’s voice is overlooked.  Today, Mercosurresembles more to the Warsaw Defense Treaty of the1960s, than to the present structure of European Union Trade initiatives. Bolivia will become a full member ofMercosur without the consent of Paraguayan government, La Paz will be entering illegally the organization from the back door.
Paraguay has been unanimously expelled from the other three Mercosur countries in June 29th, 2012, in the Summit of Mendoza, after the rightful and constitutional political impeachment against former President FernandoLugo, guided by the Paraguayan National Congress, on June 22nd, 2012.
On December 7th Mercosur Summit in Brasilia, Bolivian President Evo Morales, is expected to sign the official acceptance documents in order to seal his country’s full privileges of becoming a regular member of this trade block and further establish a healthy bondage with Hugo Chavez. As La Paz moves closer to Chavez’ Bolivarianideology, it is crystal clear that Ecuador is the next country in line to become a Mercosur member.  Its leader Rafael Correa will be the next in line to sign his country’s treaty of accession in this regional block.
In a phone interview with Speronews, Paraguayan Vice President Oscar Denis noted that “the inclusion of Bolivia into Mercosur will further increase the illegal actions taken by all its member nations, with the exception of Paraguay.” He stressed the importance “to act swiftly and establish strong commercial ties between Paraguay and the United States, and explore the possibility of bilateral agreements with other Latin American countries such as Mexico, Peru and Colombia.”
If Bolivia is accepted as a regular member in the upcoming Mercosur Summit of December 7th, without the presence of Paraguay, this will further taint the reputation of  Mercosur and these unlawful actions will be a shot in the foot to all its members except Paraguay. It is clear that Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay are violating the Treaty of Asuncion and making the same mistake twice in less than six months; beginning with the illegitimate accession of Venezuela into Mercosur and subsequently the forthcoming summit in Brasilia is another analogous violation expected to happen.
Spero columnist Peter M. Tase writes on Latin American diplomatic and trade affairs. 
The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the author only, not of Spero News.

Argentine trade barriers unfairly harming burgeoning Paraguay

ARGENTINE TRADE BARRIERS UNFAIRLY HARMING BURGEONING PARAGUAY

Wednesday, December 05, 2012

By Peter M. Tase

Paraguayan shipment containers exported through the port facilities of Argentina’s capital city of Buenos Aires have encountered additional obstacles since the beginning of 2012, immediately after Argentine President CristinaKirchner’s administration adopted its ‘Early Export Declaration’(Declaración Jurada Anticipada deImportación -DJAI) in February 2012.  These blocking measures were expected sooner or later, considering the political measures taken against Paraguay by neighboring Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay at the MERCOSURregional summit this June.
Unfortunately, it has proved to be ruinous for the Paraguayan economy since exporters to have had shipments held up in the port of Buenos Aires for week and even months. These actions taken by Kirchner’sadministration, in the past year, have further deteriorated bilateral relations between both countries; their political disagreements have taken a new shape and further deepened the divide not only on political matters but also by Argentine obstacles to Paraguayan exports, point that has characterized Kirchner’s attitude towards landlocked Paraguay.  Argentina continues to exercise what Paraguay regards as illegal authority by checking and unloading every exports container that comes from export dependent Paraguay.
Even though Paraguayan President Federico Franco’s government has sent a note of protest to the World Trade Organization and conducted many bilateral meetings with Argentinean counterparts, there is still no solution on the horizon. Argentinean authorities pretend that by controlling shipping containers, they are reducing drug trafficking  in the area bordering Paraguay.
If this is the case, then why isn’t Argentina’s government keeping open its customs facilities open on a 24-hour basis? For example, the Customs and Immigration Office at Argentina’s port at Itati, along the Parana River, is closed during the weekends.  In addition, Paraguayan individuals have frequently complained of discriminatory and illegal behavior on the part of Argentinean officials.
According to the Paraguayan Center for Economic Analysis (El Centro de Análisis yDifusión de la Economía Paraguaya (Cadep)),  Argentina’s obstacles to Paraguayan exports have caused losses of $20 million to Paraguayan exporters so far in 2012. During the course of this year, 38 percent of outfit and clothing shipments have been affected by Argentina’s blocking measures. In addition, Paraguay’s exports of commodities have fallen by 3.7 percent.  In general, Paraguayan exports have been negatively affected by the politically motivated actions made by MERCOSURmember countries, which have greatly damaged Paraguay’s potential for exports and growing presence in the global market.
Due to its abundant water and arable land, Paraguay can feed more than fifty million people thanks to its large quantities of grain production. It also one of the ten biggest exporters of beef in the world. Stevia, a plant native to Paraguay that is used as a non-caloric sweetener, is yet another product that Paraguay produces, along with sesame and tropical fruit and juice.
According to Eduardo Felippo, president of Paraguayan Industrial Union (UIP), “the exacerbating friction between Paraguay and its southern neighbor (Argentina) will never go away.” Felippo added that “even the Yacyreta BinationalHydroelectric Dam project didn’t prove to be a good investment, much less a success story for a brighter future in our bilateral relations… We should stop selling to Argentina and Brazil and seek other markets in the world, thereby diversifying Paraguay’s international markets and further industrialize [its] economy.”
Currently, President Franco’s government is analyzing the possibility of establishing new trade routes to  Chile and other Pacific Alliance member countries. On my most recent trip to Paraguay, local businessmen and government authorities discussed with me the possibility that Paraguayan exporters may seriously consider shipping their abundant goods via air cargo to markets such as the United States, Colombia, Mexico or even across the Pacific Ocean.  In the discussions, the example of Argentina’s direct air shipments of asparagus to the U.S. was cited as a model to follow.
Paraguayan President Federico Franco is seeking closer trade ties to the U.S. In November, direct flights to Paraguay from the United States were inaugurated by American Airlines. In addition, Franco is in the U.S. discussing with U.S. businesses the prospects for producing petroleum in Paraguay.
Spero columnist Peter Tase is an analyst of Latin American diplomatic and trade issues.
The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the author only, not of Spero News.

Stevia is acknowledged as Paraguay’s indigenous plant

20121203_22747_50bc834d58b6b_590Stevia is acknowledged as Paraguay’s indigenous plant

Peter Tase

International Programs Assistant to Secretary General International Federation of Engineering Education Societies.Stevia producers and farmers gathered in November 13-14, 2012 in Asuncion to discuss current challenges and accomplishments in their initiatives. Under the framework of the VI International Symposium of Stevia, president Federico Franco informed participants that Stevia or Ka’a He’ê is declared as a plant of Paraguayan Genetic Heritage.The Head of State announced substantial investments to encourage the cultivation of this natural non-caloric sweetener, discovered by Moise Giacomo Bertoni in 1887. The President of Paraguayan Chamber of Stevia Production (Capaste), Juan Barbosa, asked government representatives to enact legislation that encourages Stevia production as well as developing a certification stamp that would accompany Paraguay’s stevia products exported abroad.Franco’s government introduced in this symposium a number of initiatives in raising production, processing and marketing of Stevia Rebaudiana Bertoni in the international markets. The president noted that: “the Ministry of Agriculture and Dairy (MAG) products, is planning to invest over USD 2 million towards the production of Ka’a He’ê for the last quarter of 2013 and following next year.”Production of stevia sprouts requires high technology; the Paraguayan ministry of Agriculture is working to develop techniques, tools and research labs to facilitate the cultivation of Stevia Rebaudiana in a larger scale. Enzo Cardozo, the minister of Agriculture, expressed his commitment that “the Ministry of Agriculture will create programs of training, research and expand Stevia plantations across the country, in order to transform Paraguay into a top producer of Stevia in t he world stage. Paraguayan farmers have cultivated more than 2,200 hectares of Stevia plants.Other countries in the region such as Argentina, Ecuador and Colombia are directing their energies towards a massive farming of Stevia Rabaudiana. While technological progress is at its height, Stevia is known to be a complex plant in both production and processing. Therefore it is clear that only developed countries have the potential to provide economic assistance to conduct further research in this area.

Therefore, country such as Japan, Brazil, Hong Kong and Taiwan, that are interested in Stevia production, have improved certain technologies related to the assembly sector as well as industrial processing; product refinement and Stevia’s applications in the industry. According to a report published by PriceWaterhousecoopers, Sustainable development has progressed steadily in the last decade that should be considered as a good sign for the growth of food industry.

There is a growing number of companies that are becoming aware of sustainable development and are focused towards implementing environmental friendly practices and product development. In developed economies fair trade practices and respect of labor law are principal components of assuring a successful presence in the market. Consumers are convinced that sustainable practice and reduction of employees’ exploitation are the core values which encourage them to purchase a particular product.

There are a number of factors that contribute to new market tendencies that are in accordance with new preferences encouraged and supported by customers;

1 – Global Market Forces; 2 – New vision for large corporations management, 3 – Large Scale globalization.

According to Sunny Misser, a U.S. marketing strategist: “Sustainable business balance their economic interests to suit the needs of socially and environmentally responsible customers, the companies that succeed in the long term are those that incorporate ethical considerations into their decision-making policy, and are administered on the basis of personal integrity and broad implementation of organizational values.”

Consumers are increasing their ethical awareness; according Pejling, a Swedish magazine of the Association of Dairy Producers: “70% of Swedish consumers have a ‘blacklist’ of products and companies that do not meet the ‘personal standards’” related to social and environmental responsibility.

Stevia or Ka’a He’ê, is one of the highly acclaimed products that brings the consumer closer to farmers, by paying a fair trade price and additionally, consumers support organic production of stevia which is healthier and safe to environment sustainability.

A NEW PUBLISHING IN THE “ARGENTINA STAR” NGA PETER M.TASE

Argentina Star | Current News Headlines about Argentina

Argentina Star

 

About Argentina Star

Argentina Star was established in September 2002 to provide up-to-the minute local news, together with national and international headlines as part of a global network pooling resources to deliver a quality service to member sites. Each online publication has been modeled on a newspaper format for familiar readability by users. The locations forming part of the network were selected on the basis of demand for news for that location.

Argentina Star, effectively an online newspaper, provides coverage of the city, the metro, and regional area. International news, business and finance stories are common across the network of sites, and are drawn from a number of sources including wire services.

Argentina Star and the other sites are administered by Midwest Radio Network from offices in Sydney, Australia.

 

Bolivia poised to become new MERCOSUR member

Spero News Saturday 24th November, 2012

Mercosur member countries should vote unanimously in order to accept a new member country into its cradle. Bolivia’s accession, the same as Venezuela’s on July

 

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Stevia: indigenous plant of Paraguay

Stevia: indigenous plant of ParaguaySTEVIA: INDIGENOUS PLANT OF PARAGUAY

 This is sweet news for Paraguay, even while Argentina and other neighboring countries seek to develop their production of stevia as an alternative sweetener.
Tuesday, November 20, 2012

By Peter M. Tase

Stevia producers and farmers gathered in November 13-14, 2012 in Asuncion to discuss current challenges and accomplishments in their initiatives.Under the framework of the VI International Symposium of Stevia, President Federico Franco informed participants that Stevia or Ka’aHe’ê hs been declared as a plant of Paraguayan genetic heritage. The Head of State announced substantial investments to encourage the cultivation of this natural non-caloric sweetener, discovered by Moise GiacomoBertoni in 1887.

Stevia is a herbaceous plant and native to Paraguay that is making inroads worldwide as an alternative to traditional sugars – derived from sugar cane, sugar beets and maize – as a sweetener. It is widely used as a sweetener in Asia, and its use is growing in the United States and elsewhere.Stevia is a naturally low-calorie sweetener and has been described as a boon to people suffering with diabetesand/or obesity.

The President of Paraguayan Chamber of SteviaProduction (CAPASTE), Juan Barbosa, asked government representatives to enact legislation that encourages Steviaproduction as well as developing a certification stamp that would accompany Paraguay’s stevia products exported abroad. President Franco’s government introduced in this symposium a number of initiatives in to increase production, processing and marketing of SteviaRebaudiana Bertoni in the international markets.

The president noted that: “the Ministry of Agriculture and Dairy (MAG) products, is planning to invest over USD 2 million towards the production of Ka’a He’ê for the last quarter of 2013 and following next year.”

Production of stevia sprouts requires modern technology; the Paraguayan ministry of Agriculture is working to develop techniques, tools and research labs to facilitate the cultivation of stevia on a larger scale.

Enzo Cardozo, the minister of Agriculture, expressed his commitment that “the Ministry of Agriculture will create programs of training, research and expand Stevia plantations across the country, in order to transform Paraguay into a top producer of stevia on the world stage.

Paraguayan farmers have cultivated more than 2,200 hectares of stevia plants. Other countries in the region such as Argentina, Ecuador and Colombia are directing their energies towards large scale production of stevia.

Spero columnist Peter M Tase writes on Latin America and trade issues.

Read the article: STEVIA: INDIGENOUS PLANT OF PARAGUAY

Albania celebrates 100 years of religious tolerance

Albania celebrates 100 years of religious tolerance

By  Peter M. Tase and Arta Musara

Monday, November 19, 2012

Albania has always been considered a unique example of co-existence in terms of religion and culture. Past records show that independently from historic and political settings, Albanians showed a friendly behavior towards each other’s religious tendency.  The relation of Albanian’s with religion has not been a constant one.

There are some valid questions to answer in today’s Albanian society in order to further understand on what’s happening in a region with a variety of religion and religious communications such as the Balkans.
These matters mainly focus in the risks of the Albanian society to enliven religious conflict due to radicalization; the tendency of religion to integrate itself and the risk of clashes between democratic institutions and religious rule.
Analyzing behavior towards religion and religious behavior in today’s Albania, there are some main features coming out of the Albanian society and its relation to religion.
First, generally Albanians show a pragmatic behavior which is also related to religion. Their ultimate values are more materially oriented then spiritually oriented.
This mainly affects attitudes toward religion, as they influence attitudes of acceptance or rejection based on religious preferences, tendencies or spiritual attraction.
In the second place, it is necessary to emphasize Albanians’ tendency towards homogeneity which is reflected in their main core values as a society. Taking in consideration the variety of norms and values depending on social groups or sub-groups the individual is an essential part of it, when it comes to make generalizations, they tend to act unvaryingly towards religion, faith and diversity.  The salient characteristic of Albania’s long period of the communist regime was the establishment of an equal society in all aspects, including expectations and an equal social class for all, causing tremendous consequences in the burgeoning of social standards and attitude to reinforce “the power of the people” which it turned out be “a responsibility of all.”
In trying to differentiate between instrumental and religious values as well cultural influences on them, even in historic arguments, there has been a distinction between Muslim believers and orthodox or catholic worshipers in their attitudes towards intellectual accomplishments and professional choices. The last two groups have historically been focused on their education and their scholarly work clearly testifies willingness for a greater flexibility and greater engagement in urbanization processes, an attitude which is entirely different from the firmness of Muslim population in the country in relation to the afore mentioned life aspects of Albanian society.
The religious heritage to the majority of Albanian society is less influential in differentiating alternatives and attitudes than the social status’ role. The social groups or subgroups belong to culture, age and profession, etc., represent variables which create a greater homogeneity in core values and cause differences in secondary values and related attitudes. This is a possible explanation of this greater tolerance Albanians show towards diverse cultural, religious and ethnical stereotypes.
Since late September, Albanian Prime Minister, Sali Berisha has chaired various meetings of the national committee in charge of coordinating the 100th anniversary ofAlbania’s independence, scheduled to commence on Nov. 28th, 2012.
Berisha called upon every committee member to improve the communication between government offices while arranging various historical events in which a special importance will be given to religious tolerance in Albania.
November 28th will be a historic date of festivities, not only in Albania but also for every Albanian community in Montenegro, Macedonia and Kosovo. Albania’s anniversary of statehood will revive the historical successes and blunders of the last 100 years, in addition to salient traditions in Religious coexistence and ecumenism.
According to Berisha,“now is the time to establish more active action teams that would better arrange the celebrations at every Albanian small town.”
The current process of preparations has consisted of many discussions derived from a significant historical legacy, which at times has been constructive and unproductive. Historical facts encourage Albanian people to better reflect and evaluate appropriately historic information that may have currently been altered.
For Mr. Berisha “the noteworthy historical controversies have been debated for a long time and thanks to these discussions [Albanians] have revealed the truth that has been ignored in many levels in the past. Debates in this small country of the Western Balkans are evolving in a constant course, their dynamic influence never ends, but religious tolerance and coexistence will never fade from the nations historical memory”
This is a perfect opportunity for the Albanian society and politicians to recognize Albania’s accomplishments and historic blunders of the past as well as to view the future with new hopes, aspirations and see Albaniabecome a full member of the European Union; a constant aspiration of Albanian politics for more than two decades.
Albania’s European Union Integration process has taken over two decades and the its government is making little progress on the vital electoral reform laws, consolidation of democratic institutions, ensuring theindependence of the court system from political pressure as well as the fight against corruption. Hopes remain high for Albania to join the European family when Tirana has fulfilled the necessary legislative recommendations and reforms.
Peter M. Tase writes for Spero News and Arta Musaraj is the editor in chief of  Academicus International Scientific Magazine.            

Read the article: Albania celebrates 100 years of religious tolerance

The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the author only, not of Spero News.